Indigestion, nausea, and bloating more common during menopause in certain ethnic groups

Hormonal changes during the menopause transition have been shown to affect a woman’s gastrointestinal (GI) functions with some unpleasant results such as nausea, bloating, and abdominal pain. A new study suggests that a woman’s race/ethnicity and menopause status may partially determine the severity of these symptoms. Study results are published online today in Menopause. With […]

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Family-centered nutrition influences diet behaviors for children with autism

Adapting family-centered nutrition programs can positively influence diet behaviors in children with autism, according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is one of the most common developmental disabilities in children. Because many children with autism battle with obesity, researchers evaluated the adaptation and implementation of […]

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MRI’s may be initial window into CTE diagnosis in living; approach may shave years off diagnosis

While chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) cannot yet be diagnosed during life, a new study provides the best evidence to date that a commonly used brain imaging technique, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), may expedite the ability to diagnose CTE with confidence in the living. Researchers have found that participants diagnosed with CTE post-mortem had shrinkage in […]

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Is home management by remote self-monitoring an alternative for women with intermediate- and high-risk pregnancies?

In a study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica that included 400 women with intermediate- and high-risk pregnancies, self-monitoring—in which the women themselves collected blood pressure, temperature, cardiotocography and other parameters (including blood samples in selected cases) and transferred the information to healthcare professionals using a mobile device platform—was a viable substitute for in-person […]

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To what extent are children harmed by medications in pediatric intensive care units?

In an observational study conducted across three pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) in England over a three-month period in 2019, one-sixth of patients experienced at least one adverse drug event, in which they were harmed by a medication. In the study published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 302 patients were included and 62 […]

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